South Korea's porn problem

Updated: Jan 8


Molka Protests in Seoul, South Korea

It’s always weird as fuck when people make trends out of literal crimes, but in South Korea there’s a trend that blows egging or even SWATting out of the water.


It’s called molka and it’s gross as shit. Pornography is banned in South Korea, so horny (mostly) men have taken porn into their own hands in the worst way imaginable. Molka is the act of filming (mostly) women without their consent, usually through spy cameras hidden in public places like motel rooms, restrooms, or hospital changing rooms.


The footage is then posted on pornhub, dedicated websites, and social media like Twitter or Tumblr before Tumblr decided it hated furries and fun -- which I guess is a good thing in this case. The joke doesn’t really work but I don’t have anything better, so.


Anyway, it’s so bad that there’s a whole industry based around this stuff -- in 2019, The Verge reported that two men had been arrested for secretly filming 1,600 hotel guests. The operation reportedly earned $6,200, mostly in subscription fees.


Here’s the thing: I know some of you are looking at this story and thinking some ignorant shit like “what’s the big deal? It’s not like these people are being assaulted, and anyway, plenty of women sell pictures like these on OnlyFans on purpose,” or something. Looking at you Mr. Plays-Devil’s-Advocate-in-the-comments-of-the-girl-you-couldn’t-get-with-in-high-school’s-feminist-Facebook-post.

Mr. Plays-Devil’s-Advocate-in-the-comments-of-the-girl-you-couldn’t-get-with-in-high-school’s-feminist-Facebook-post.

But posting these pictures and videos without consent is a real problem. When you strip someone of their ability to make decisions about their lives and especially about their bodies, an ability referred to as ‘agency’ by dweebs, it has real negative impacts on that person’s sense of self-worth and mental health. Trust me, we’ve been doing it to women and minority groups for centuries.


Take the case of a young South Korean woman who worked in that hospital I mentioned earlier. Her family told the BBC that after a clinical pathologist working in the same hospital allegedly secretly filmed her and others changing, she was “wracked by nightmares and was prescribed antidepressants.” She would eventually jump from the 17th floor of a building.


The government of South Korea has also been shaky in its response to what president Moon Jae-in characterized as an “epidemic” in 2018, a year after reported molka cases jumped from 2,400 in 2012 to 6,400.


Wee Eun-jin, a lawyer for many molka victims told the Guardian in 2018 that the law doesn’t do enough to protect victims, with perpetrators often catching meager fines. Organizers of the women’s march in Seoul that year also spoke to the Guardian of double standards in the policing of molka, citing a case where cops paraded a female perpetrator in front of the media — women reportedly make up about 2% of perpetrators.


The moral of the story is don’t be a fucking creep. Pay for your homegirl’s OnlyFans, simp an e-girl, or hype up your partner’s nudes. I promise it’s a lot less work than installing hidden cameras to film strangers changing. Seriously, what the fuck is wrong with you? Also, South Korea, please legalize porn, it’s not 1938 anymore.


UPDATE: I wrote this story like 3 months ago (sorry to ruin the illusion for everyone, but also I don’t care) and when I was on my way to finally record the episode, I scrolled past this article on Twitter. The South Korean government has sentenced Cho Ju-bin to 40 years in prison for blackmailing or otherwise manipulating at least 74 women into sending him sexually explicit content. Among these women were 16 minors.


Cho Ju-bin

Cho, a 24-year old who called himself “doctor,” which — big incel energy — refused to admit to blackmailing the women when he was arrested in March, thereby forcing some to testify in court. Cho posted the material in a chat room on Telegram, where some members paid as much as $1766 CAD to view it. Activists have called on authorities to investigate Cho’s subscribers, and they have been, so let’s hope none of those pedos are powerful enough that Cho mysteriously wakes up dead in his cell.


I felt I had to update this story because one, that was a really good Epstein joke, and two, I gave the South Korean government a lot of well deserved shit for their response to online sex crimes. Cho didn’t get off so easy, which is encouraging. However, this was not molka, this was mass extortion and pedophilia and it’s pretty fucked up that that’s what it took to get a real response on this issue. The end for real.


Colman Brown

Instagram: @Lankmun